UL in History: Christmas Traditions

Dr Clifton W. Potter Jr. ~ UL History Professor

With Thanksgiving behind us, all thoughts are on the long vacation. However,

there is one great barrier to cross before we can enjoy the holiday season—final exams.

There was a time, not so very long ago when exams were given after Christmas vacation

and not before it. One would drag all the books and research materials home with every

intention of studying for finals during the holidays or writing that term paper which had

been hanging around your neck like the albatross. Only the highly disciplined were able

to study and write a paper during Christmas; I was not among them.

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UL in History: Christmas Dance

Dr. Clifton W. Potter Jr. ~ UL History Professor

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Illustrations by Nicole Freewalt. 

When this edition of The Critograph appears there will be two weeks left before

the beginning of the examination period. I know that both faculty and students are

looking forward to the long vacation and beginning a brand-new semester in mid-

January.

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UL in History: Fall Feelings

Dr. Clifton W. Potter Jr. ~ UL History Professor

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Illustration by Nicole Freewalt 

On November 1st my wife and I flew to Albuquerque for the annual meeting of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Dr. Scott Amos, the Chair of the History Department and I both read papers. Over the years, I have enjoyed the opportunity of sharing my research with other scholars in my discipline. I traveled all over the United States and Canada from coast to coast thanks to the generous support of our university, but this was the last time, and I shall miss the chances to share ideas and theories with colleagues from all over the globe. I am glad the meeting was held in New Mexico, which is my favorite state—after Virginia of course. The sky was turquoise and the cottonwood trees glowed like burnished gold.

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The Kennedy Challenge

Dr. Clifton W. Potter, UofL History Professor~

Next Tuesday is election day, perhaps one of the most important contests in our nation’s history. The ballots cast, the races won, and the races lost could determine the course of our nation’s history for at least the next generation, if not beyond that. Possibly not since 1932 has the United States faced such critical choices as it does next week. If you are a registered voter, do not fail to do your civic duty.

However, in this column I want to turn back the clock to another moment in time when the horizon was cloudless, and the future stretched before some of us like a road without curves, bumps, or barriers. It was the fall of 1960.

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Gone to the Dogs

Dr. Clifton W. Potter, UofL History Professor~

pupsFrom time to time the University of Lynchburg has gone to the dogs—at least in my memory. I well recall Trooper, a large black and white spaniel who guarded his mistress, Margaret Candler ’60, whenever she was on campus. She was a town student whose family lived on College Street.

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The Hundley Legacy

Dr. Clifton W. Potter, UofL History Professor~

Last week as Hurricane Michael approached Central Virginia representatives from the City of Lynchburg echoed their strident remarks about College Lake—a local landmark that vanished during the night of August 2, 2018.  The powers that be in City Hall have ignored the problems associated with College Lake that have been accumulating for years like the silt and Escherichia coli which now fill the site. When the long-neglected dam—which the city owns—seemed on the verge of collapsing, the order was given that that lake be drained, and thus was removed part of the legacy of our fourth president, Dr. John T.T. Hundley, who was elected to that office on June 7, 1915.  He would alter the very character of the college during his twenty-one tenure.

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The End of An Era!

Dr. Clifton W. Potter, UofL History Professor~

retirement

Last Thursday, my retirement at the end of this academic year was announced on social media, and in a heartbeat, it was all over the web. Sixty years ago, an announcement of this kind would have been appeared first in The Critograph. My career in collegiate journalism began in September 1958, but by the time I graduated in 1962, I had worked on all the Lynchburg College publications, edited The Prism, and was President of The Board of Publications.

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