Coronavirus hitting African-Americans the hardest

By Joshua Price ~ Multimedia Editor
When the coronavirus first began to spread in the United States there was this running joke going around social media. Twitter especially, the joke was that African-Americans were immune to the coronavirus.Research now shows that isn’t the case.
For example New York, the state has been hit hard with coronavirus cases. It is the epicenter of the disease in the United States.
According to Jamelle Bouie of the New York Times  blacks in low income areas are more susceptible to the disease because of the type of jobs they have and the way they travel.

He said, “black Americans are more likely to work in service sector jobs, least likely to own a car and least likely to own their homes. They are therefore more likely to be in close contact with other people, from the ways they travel to the kinds of work they do to the conditions in which they live.”
This can explain such a high percentage in cases amongst African-Americans and deaths amongst African-Americans.
 University of Maryland Eastern-Shore student, and New York City resident Candace Brown said, “Manhattan is a ghost town, and the subway stations are empty But i’m used to being so active, so everything is really weird at the moment.”
Likewise in Maryland, there is a very high number of coronavirus cases amongst African-Americans.  African-Americans suffer from a number of alignments that put them more at risk to catch and succumb to the coronavirus.
The graph above shows that there are 2,000 more African Americans with the virus than any other race.
Khyla Harrel, an African American Maryland resident said, “My grandfather is high risk so when he caught the virus we immediately sent to the ICU he has been fighting but it has been hard on us.”
She also said they have been keeping her grandmother home to avoid her catching the virus.
The virus hasn’t peaked in Maryland as yet but residents don’t adhere self isolate and practice social distancing numbers like these will likely continue to rise.