The Reality of Quarantine

By Hailey Bayne ~ Guest Writer

The Colonial Theatre in South Hill has closed due to the pandemic while changing their sign to state “Wash Hands” in an effort to encourage the public to follow the CDC’s recommendations. South Hill, Va., Friday, Mar. 27, 2020. Photo by Hailey Bayne

Quarantine during the COVID-19 crisis is helping prevent the spread of the virus, but this isolation may be causing a decline in mental health and productivity.

A study conducted by Qualtrics shows that 41.6% of respondents have experienced a decline in mental health since the outbreak, with 66.9% reporting higher stress, 57.2% reporting higher anxiety, and 53% reporting an increased sadness in their lives.

Young adults, Caroline Landry age 19 and Braxton Carey age 20 feel as though they are experiencing a decline in their mental health.

Carey stated, “At first it was really rough … not being around people. I was very sad, very depressed, but as time went on I built a routine, which has helped me feel better. But, I have definitely been getting very depressed.”

While Landry stated that she has felt more depressed and anxious from being quarantined as well.

In addition to mental health worsening, students who are trying to cope with a new learning environment may be facing difficulties as well.

As of April 16th, 27 states and 3 U.S. territories have ordered or recommended school building closures for the rest of the academic year, which has affected about 25.2 million U.S. students.

Landry, who is a current student at the University of Lynchburg, said, “It’s really, really hard because being stuck at home all day, my home is pretty toxic, makes it really hard to focus on school. Especially with everything else going on.”

University of Lynchburg sophomore James Cardenas stated, “It’s difficult, discipline is lacking. I think for some people it does drastically affect their studies and how well they do in their classes, which is why I think the University of Lynchburg is implementing this pass/fail system.”

It’s important during this time of isolation for people to focus on their personal needs and feelings. The World Health Organization recommends many tactics for dealing with this temporary way of life that are aimed at all different types of people. It is recommended to read through their information if you or a loved one are struggling.