Major Changes Are Coming to Lynchburg’s College of Business

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Dean Nancy Hubbard has implemented many changes in the College of Business. Photo from the University of Lynchburg

By Allyssa Compton

The University of Lynchburg’s College of Business is in the process of creating and approving several interdisciplinary majors and minors to expand the offerings available to students and to differentiate the university from other schools.

The College of Business has been busy developing new, mixed-discipline majors and minors, including actuarial science, sustainability and international business.

Nancy Hubbard, dean of the College of Business, has been influential in the development of these new offerings. Under her guidance, two new minors, digital media marketing and arts administration, have already been approved and added to the course catalogue.

Dean Hubbard recognizes that the College of Business cannot  compete with larger schools in every aspect, but she said that she asks herself, “what can we offer that [other universities] don’t offer, that students may find appealing?”

Dean Hubbard explained that interdisciplinary majors and minors are becoming increasingly popular because “students have figured out that the world is not a silo, so they would like to learn things that go across a variety of different topics, especially if they have an interest in an area.”

Lynchburg business students also see the importance of being able to minor in different areas of study.

Sophomore marketing major Nick Prechel believes that the ability to minor in interdisciplinary areas is beneficial because students can learn more about a specific subject related to business without having to study it for their entire college careers.

“You’re never just focused on what you’re doing,” Nick Prechel noted. “You’re always going to have to be working with other people, especially if you want a managerial position.”

Professor Frank Whitehouse, who has taught business at the University of Lynchburg for over 40 years, recognizes that having knowledge of other disciplines is essential for business people.

“You have to be prepared to drill down and specialize, depending upon the needs of the moment, in other areas,” said Whitehouse, “having a broader, more rich reference frame and knowledge base often times is helpful.”

Though the College of Business has not publicized its pending programs, information about the minors that have already been approved can be found on the University of Lynchburg website.