The Time for Change is Now

Carter Elliot, Staff Columnist~

Let me start my saying that I am in no way, shape or form anti-gun. I grew up on a dairy farm where shooting water bottles and clay pigeons was a very common occurrence. I even shot competitive shotgun when I was sixteen.

However, since 1991 we have had eight mass shootings, resulting in the deaths of 229 people. The scariest part of this statistic is that 193 of the total 229 people killed in mass shootings in the United States have been since 2007. Let me make this even more clear: 84 percent of all people killed in mass shootings since 1991 were killed in the past decade. This stark rise in mass shootings has caused much chaos and fear in the United States, yet somehow we haven’t done anything to prevent this on a major scale. Read More


Ted Talks: Building Character

Kelvin Whitehurst, Staff Writer~

If you had the chance to meet Ted Duvall last Friday, you’d know that Duvall is a beekeeper, Lynchburg Alumni and Executive Producer of The Incredible Dr. Pol at National Geographic. Duvall returned to campus to hold his seminar titled “LC to TV: A 30 Year Career in TV” and visited classrooms, telling his story as a student here on campus as well as his experience in the ever-changing media industry. Read More


Cuddle Weather

Sarah Irby, Editor in Chief~

It’s fall, y’all! You know what that means? It means the weather is going to start getting cooler, the sweaters, scarves and boots are going to come out, and we’re all going to be sipping on our pumpkin spice lattes. The season also means it’s prime time for snuggling, so you better get your cuddle buddies ready. Read More





The Great and Powerful Osborne

Dr. Clifton W. Potter, LC History Professor~

From 1955 until his retirement in 1987, Dr. Paul Osborne was a member of the biology department. These are the simple facts of his tenure at Lynchburg College, but the story of “Oz, great and powerful” encompasses more than two dates separated by a hyphen. Actually, the hyphen is what really matters. During his thirty-two years as a member of the faculty, Dr. Osborne was one of our most popular professors.  He was not the performer that Dr. John Mahan was, although he had a wonderfully dry sense of humor. He did not enjoy the celebrity of Dr. Ruskin Freer, whose name was almost a household word in Central Virginia, but the mere mention of Dr. Osborne will elicit a host of memories from alumni. Read More